Sitting vs. Siting: What’s the Difference?

“Sitting” and “siting” are two words that are often confused with one another because they are homophones, which means they sound (almost) the same but have different spellings and meanings.

Here are the differences between the two words:

  1. Definition

“Sitting” is the present participle of the verb “sit.” It means to be seated or to take a seat.

Example: She is sitting on the couch.

“Siting” is the present participle of the verb “site.” It means to build or place something in a particular position.

Example:

The architect is siting the new building on the corner lot.

The lab is sited beside the hall.

  1. Part of Speech

“Sitting” is a verb that can also be used as a noun or an adjective.

Example:

  • Verb: She is sitting in the chair.
  • Noun: The sitting of the jury will begin next week.
  • Adjective: He is a sitting president.

“Siting” is a verb usually used as a participle but can also be used as a gerund or a noun.

Example:

  • Participle: The contractor is siting the new building.
  • Gerund: Siting the new building was a difficult task.
  • Noun: The siting of the new building was controversial.
  1. Usage

The word “sitting” is most commonly used to refer to a person or an animal being seated.

Example: She is sitting in the park.

The word “siting” is most commonly used to refer to the act or process of building, placing, or locating something.

Example: The city council is siting a new park in the downtown area.

In summary, “sitting” and “siting” are two words that sound the same but have different meanings and uses. “Sitting” refers to being seated or taking a seat, while “siting” refers to the process of building or locating something in a particular position.

Sponsored

Leave a Comment